1. Magnetic fields. It is widely believed that the Sun's magnetic field is generated by electrical currents acting as a magnetic dynamo inside the Sun. These electrical currents are generated by the flow of hot, ionized gases in the Sun's convection zone. This you can see, as the solar flare falls back along seemingly invisible fields.

  2. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  3. Dumb question, maybe, but does the sun have gravity? If no, what makes some of the solar flare “fall” back to the surface like that? I guess it has to have gravity. Never mind. Thanks for attending my Ted question.

  4. Magnetic fields. It is widely believed that the Sun's magnetic field is generated by electrical currents acting as a magnetic dynamo inside the Sun. These electrical currents are generated by the flow of hot, ionized gases in the Sun's convection zone. This you can see, as the solar flare falls back along seemingly invisible fields.

  5. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  6. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  7. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  8. Anyone have a rough estimate of how this flare scales in comparison to earth?

  9. roughly, and i mean very roughly… 10-15 earths along the length of that flare.

  10. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  11. [Video/images source] NASA - Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft: When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 2011). This event was captured in extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft . Some of the material blew out into space and other portions fell back to the surface. Because SDO images are super-HD, we can zoom in on the action and still see exquisite details. And using a cadence of a frame taken every 24 seconds, the sense of motion is, by all appearances, seamless.

  12. More in Common with a Kangaroo then a Dog, Cat or Tiger.

  13. correct! marsupials and mammals are not closely related to each other. marsupials are more closely related to each other than mammals, and mammals are more closely related to each other than marsupials. the reason for its canid features is convergent evolution. super interesting stuff!!

  14. while it does appear more dog-like, it is neither dog, nor cat. it is a marsupial!

  15. Question: why is this called a tiger, it looks more like a dog type animal.

  16. because of its stripes! however, it is also nicknamed the tasmanian wolf because of its canid features.

  17. [Video source] NFSA - “Original 35mm nitrate negative film shot by naturalist David Fleay at Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart in December 1933. Colourised by Samuel François-Steininger at the Paris-based, Composite Films, from a 4K scan of the negative by the National Film and Sound Archive Australia.”

  18. no tf about it really, a beautiful creature that we wiped out selfishly.

  19. [Video source] NFSA - “Original 35mm nitrate negative film shot by naturalist David Fleay at Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart in December 1933. Colourised by Samuel François-Steininger at the Paris-based, Composite Films, from a 4K scan of the negative by the National Film and Sound Archive Australia.”

  20. despite having a canine appearance, it is an extinct species of marsupial.

  21. yes! and in fact, it was one of only two marsupial species where both sexes had pouches.

  22. [Video source] NFSA - “Original 35mm nitrate negative film shot by naturalist David Fleay at Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart in December 1933. Colourised by Samuel François-Steininger at the Paris-based, Composite Films, from a 4K scan of the negative by the National Film and Sound Archive Australia.”

  23. [Video source] NFSA - “Original 35mm nitrate negative film shot by naturalist David Fleay at Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart in December 1933. Colourised by Samuel François-Steininger at the Paris-based, Composite Films, from a 4K scan of the negative by the National Film and Sound Archive Australia.”

  24. [About the filming/video] NFSA - “The colourised Fleay film features Benjamin, the last captive thylacine. We see Benjamin lying down, walking around the perimeter of the small enclosure, opening his mouth wide, sniffing the air and scratching. Fleay, a conservationist who advanced the breeding of endangered species in captivity, was bitten on the buttocks after shooting the film. At just under 80 seconds, Fleay's footage is the longest single film of the 10 separate thylacine films known to exist.”

  25. [Video source] NFSA - “Original 35mm nitrate negative film shot by naturalist David Fleay at Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart in December 1933. Colourised by Samuel François-Steininger at the Paris-based, Composite Films, from a 4K scan of the negative by the National Film and Sound Archive Australia.”

  26. can you please tell me where you got the little green bulbasaur stone?

  27. Etsy!! Gf got it for me for a birthday, so I'm not exactly sure how she ran into it.

  28. Whats the purpose of calling it a "metre" and not "meter?"

  29. Gotcha, not sure why I got downvoted for simply asking a question lol. God forbid I want to expand my knowledge!

  30. Correct me if I'm wrong. I was told that inorder for sound to travel, an atmosphere must exist. So does this mean an atmosphere exists on Venus? Or should I say away from science?

  31. Venus has a thick, toxic atmosphere filled with carbon dioxide and it’s perpetually shrouded in thick, yellowish clouds of sulfuric acid that trap heat, causing a runaway greenhouse effect. It’s the hottest planet in our solar system. Venus has crushing air pressure at its surface – more than 90 times that of Earth – similar to the pressure you'd encounter a mile below the ocean on Earth.

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